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Rory Brown Shares Healthy Habits While Traveling 

It seems I am always traveling.

 

As a food critic, it’s my business to travel around the United States and the world, checking out new restaurants and sharing my opinions with my readers. I can hear you saying “Getting paid to travel and eat. Nice business to have,” but make no mistake, it is work.

 

Plane rides can be exhausting – especially if you’re on a trip that requires multiple connections, meaning you have to amuse yourself in airports for hours on end. And while I do enjoy driving – I’m able to stop anywhere along the highway that catches my eye – there’s no denying that zooming down five-lane highways with bumper-to-bumper traffic from start to finish can be a bit stressful.

 

So, I thought I’d share a few tips on how to eat healthy while you’re traveling– because I know that it’s hard to do!

 

1. Pack fruits and vegetables for the trip
Depending on what airline you fly, the length of the flight, and if you’re in economy or business class, you may have access to meal service. But it’s always a good idea to bring your own food along, such as your favorite sandwiches and a selection of fruits and vegetables.

 

Bringing your own food is also a good idea if you’re driving long distances. Too often people get bored, and when they stop for gas, and they’ll pick up a candy bar or two to eat once they’re back on the road. By having a supply of veggies or fruits to snack on, you’ll avoid that temptation.

 

2. Drink lots of water
It’s easy to get dehydrated on a plane, and dehydration is never good. Be sure to drink plenty of water before the flight, and have something to drink on the flight. This may necessitate that you have to get up to use the bathroom in mid-air, but that’s a good thing. It’s always a good idea to get up and stretch your legs if you’re on a long flight.

 

And the same holds true if you’re driving. Sitting in one position for more than a few hours is not good – it puts pressure on your legs, and you may develop a deep-leg thrombosis or blood clot. DVT is an “occupational hazard” for truck drivers, but even tourists who just don’t like to stop until they get to their destination (you know who you are) can develop this condition as well.

 

So, make it a habit to stop at each highway rest area you see. (Yes, stop for at least a brief walk every 40-50 miles if possible.) These rest areas typically have vending machines, but you’ll have your healthy snacks of fruits and veggies. Be sure to walk around, perhaps enjoying the information signs most of these places have.

 

3. Eat normal portions
Skipping a meal will have consequences later. If you maintain your eating habits of breakfast, lunch, and dinner while you’re traveling, you won’t suddenly find yourself “starving to death” which in turn results in you eating twice as much as you normally do at a restaurant.

 

Hotels usually have free fruit on offer, even if they don’t offer free cereal or hot breakfasts as well. I believe in the old adage that breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

4. Stretch
Whenever I stop in at a hotel, I make it a point to check out their exercise room. Usually, they’ve got a few treadmills and a stationary bike or two. And I never see anyone using them.

 

Perhaps it’s because once people land at an airport, they’ve got the stress of getting their luggage, then waiting for a shuttle bus to get to their rental car, then have to drive through unfamiliar traffic to get to their hotel, and once there, they just want to have a nice hot meal and relax. What I do is various stretching exercises. And I try to meditate while I stretch – breathing deeply and concentrating on working all the kinks out of my body.

 

5. Plan your trip
The more you can plan regarding your trip, the less stressful it will be. The less stressed you are, the less tendency you’ll have to eat “comfort food.” Packing fruit and veggies for the road, making sure you stop for breakfast and lunch as well as dinner if you’re driving, and taking frequent breaks for exercise will help keep you healthy and ward off illnesses on your trip.

It seems I am always traveling.

As a food critic, it’s my business to travel around the United States and the world, checking out new restaurants and sharing my opinions with my readers. I can hear you saying “Getting paid to travel and eat. Nice business to have,” but make no mistake, it is work.

Plane rides can be exhausting – especially if you’re on a trip that requires multiple connections, meaning you have to amuse yourself in airports for hours on end. And while I do enjoy driving – I’m able to stop anywhere along the highway that catches my eye – there’s no denying that zooming down five-lane highways with bumper-to-bumper traffic from start to finish can be a bit stressful.

So, I thought I’d share a few tips on how to eat healthy while you’re traveling– because I know that it’s hard to do!

1. Pack fruits and vegetables for the trip
Depending on what airline you fly, the length of the flight, and if you’re in economy or business class, you may have access to meal service. But it’s always a good idea to bring your own food along, such as your favorite sandwiches and a selection of fruits and vegetables.

Bringing your own food is also a good idea if you’re driving long distances. Too often people get bored, and when they stop for gas, and they’ll pick up a candy bar or two to eat once they’re back on the road. By having a supply of veggies or fruits to snack on, you’ll avoid that temptation.

2. Drink lots of water
It’s easy to get dehydrated on a plane, and dehydration is never good. Be sure to drink plenty of water before the flight, and have something to drink on the flight. This may necessitate that you have to get up to use the bathroom in mid-air, but that’s a good thing. It’s always a good idea to get up and stretch your legs if you’re on a long flight.

And the same holds true if you’re driving. Sitting in one position for more than a few hours is not good – it puts pressure on your legs, and you may develop a deep-leg thrombosis or blood clot. DVT is an “occupational hazard” for truck drivers, but even tourists who just don’t like to stop until they get to their destination (you know who you are) can develop this condition as well.

So, make it a habit to stop at each highway rest area you see. (Yes, stop for at least a brief walk every 40-50 miles if possible.) These rest areas typically have vending machines, but you’ll have your healthy snacks of fruits and veggies. Be sure to walk around, perhaps enjoying the information signs most of these places have.

3. Eat normal portions
Skipping a meal will have consequences later. If you maintain your eating habits of breakfast, lunch, and dinner while you’re traveling, you won’t suddenly find yourself “starving to death” which in turn results in you eating twice as much as you normally do at a restaurant.

Hotels usually have free fruit on offer, even if they don’t offer free cereal or hot breakfasts as well. I believe in the old adage that breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

4. Stretch
Whenever I stop in at a hotel, I make it a point to check out their exercise room. Usually, they’ve got a few treadmills and a stationary bike or two. And I never see anyone using them.

Perhaps it’s because once people land at an airport, they’ve got the stress of getting their luggage, then waiting for a shuttle bus to get to their rental car, then have to drive through unfamiliar traffic to get to their hotel, and once there, they just want to have a nice hot meal and relax. What I do is various stretching exercises. And I try to meditate while I stretch – breathing deeply and concentrating on working all the kinks out of my body.

About: Rory Brown delivers food criticism and lifestyle advice to a global readership spanning three continents. With bases in Charleston, SC, Kauai, Sydney, and Lake Como, he provides sharp, well-researched analysis of current diet discourse while never missing an important restaurant opening. Rory Brown’s gastronomic philosophy is grounded in good food, good health, and good company.

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